MAI VS. AUGUST

“This is Robert Trout in Paris with a dimension on that popular pastime, rioting”

Robert Trout wasn’t a fan of the Parisian students who resisted and persisted in May 1968, nor of the police with whom they tussled. Together, they made his grocery man late and closed his favorite restaurants. The sting of tear gas made getting home a chore — you had to cover your face “like the bad guy, the bandit in an old style Western movie,” as he put it to his radio listeners. And that was if one could get home. Once during “Mai ’68,” Trout was stuck in Paris traffic for so long the people in front of him started playing chess on the hood of their car.

Trout’s press pass for an international conference in Paris, 1968. Robert Trout Papers.

Continue reading

Please follow and like us:

The George Crile III Papers

Charlie Did It. (Just Ask George)

During the 1980s, the United States government provided covert assistance to the Mujahideen, an Afghan rebel force engaged in armed revolt against their Russian occupiers. At the heart of these clandestine efforts was a not-so-covert Texan, Congressman Charlie Wilson. 6’7” in his boots, Wilson made multiple trips to Afghanistan between 1982 and 1988, where he was greeted as a hero. The reason: Wilson’s wheeling and dealing in the U.S. House of Representatives (he was a member of the Defense Appropriations Subcommittee) enabled millions of dollars in equipment and supplies to be funneled to the rebels.  

Continue reading

Please follow and like us: